KOKO Communications focuses on cause marketing and excellent design for non-profit across all media platforms. We believe strong design can drive positive social change.
Reblogged from livingwithlymphoma  11 notes

livingwithlymphoma:

himynameis-rachel:

Chemo Ninja! & Other designs.

A while back I uploaded some designs to a website called Society6, who print and sell items with your designs on. They do all of the manufacturing work - sourcing the material, printing, posting etc but if somebody buys something with your design on you get a small amount of it (10% I think). Anyway I thought it would be worth a go and went ahead and created a online store, and only last week, a few months after starting it, did anything sell. But it did give me the idea to do some cancer related t-shirt designs to contribute to my fundraising for Cancer Research UK. I looked around on the website and on other sites but didn’t find anything I personally liked - they were all either badly designed or a bit floral and mature, so I saw that as a ‘gap in the market’ so to speak and came up with a few designs I liked. One is just a very subtle heart design with plain ribbon in, the other uses ‘chemo ninja’ which is used across some of the badly designed items i mentioned before, the other is a quote i liked again with the plain ribbon, and the final one is just something i totally related too - “secretly hoping chemo gives me super powers”. Anyway I’ve been trying to think of ways to push my Race for Life fundraising efforts - for instance I might find something ridiculous to wear during the run to gain more sponsors, but for now I thought I could upload these, and if any sell, then any profits i get from them will go on to my fundraising total in July. Given the lack of sales on my old designs i don’t have much expectations but i thought it was worth a go! So if you like any of them, go ahead and buy one! You can also get them as vests, iPhone covers, bags, pillows, clocks and mugs. I even have this cheeky code so you can get free shipping to the UK!! Of course, the most effective way to help me out with my fundraising efforts would be a good old fashioned sponsor, which you can do by just clicking here. Anyway, hope you like the t-shirts!

^ For those that don’t know, that’s my other blog that I’ve kept since Uni! I only post design related stuff on there, but this post is relative to this blog too. Thought it would be easier to just reblog on to here…

Negative space, positive impact in Fiat’s ‘Don’t text and drive’ campaign.

Leo Burnett ad agency produced these brilliant designs using negative space, to highlight the issue with texting and driving. What do you see, the letter, or the little girl? The ‘N’ or the dog? We really love the contract and use of negative space here. What do you think?

"You either see the letter or the bus. Don’t text and drive"

Are you using your Dog as a food bin? Print advertisement hits home about dogs health

Columbian designer Cristhian Ramírez was tasked with creating a series of ads for ‘Dog Chow’, a brand new dog food from Purina. Cristhian worked on their campaign, entitled ‘Stop treating your dog like a trashcan’, producing these brilliant print ads.

The ads portray the concept perfectly, but does it make you think twice about what your feeding your dog?

3 Things we can learn from #StephensStory
This week, fundraising on JustGiving has reached a new high. All previous records have been broken thanks to Stephen Sutton, a terminally ill young cancer patient from Birmingham.

1) Emotionally true, viral trends can’t always be manufactured.
One reason Stephens Sutton story touched so many people, was because this came not from a charity, not from a CEO or digital media editor. This came from a young man with a goal to raise as much money as possible before he died. Authenticity like this cannot be manufactured by your charity, nor should it be. Stephens Goodbye message on Facebook was not a manufactured attempt to go viral, but it worked because it was honest, it had a genuine urgency (there was a chance he might not wake to see the original goal of £1million pound being raised) and because it captured people hearts. Of course a big help to all of this is that the infrastructure to donate was already in place. There was already a text donate number set up, he had an already very successful JustGiving page and had been raising money for over a year. 2) Charity’s need to be on the ball
We saw this a few months ago with the #nomakeupselfie - Cancer Research UK did not begin this viral trend, but it was online to ride of the back of it. It quickly responded, creating a hashtag, photo with amazing statistics worth sharing, and a relavent text donate number. Stephen’s Story has been yet another example of how important it is for your charity to be online every day. These viral trends tend to peak over a space of 24 hours, so your social media team can’t just be a Monday - Friday 9 - 5 job. They need space and freedom to post without sign offs, as these campaigns often rely on an urgent response. Teenage Cancer Trust quickly picked up on the sudden success and global reach of Stephens Story following his Facebook farewell post. Not only that, but JustGiving increased their servers to allow more people to donate, as announced on their Facebook page. 3) People want to donate and help.
Next time a charity, fundraiser, individual in the street or anybody else tells you they are struggling to raise money because ‘people don’t want to donate/sponsor/part with their cash’ - give them some encouragement and remind them of Stephen, a 19 year old boy who one day, from his deathbed, encouraged over £20k’s worth of donations per hour. Well done Stephen.

3 Things we can learn from #StephensStory

This week, fundraising on JustGiving has reached a new high. All previous records have been broken thanks to Stephen Sutton, a terminally ill young cancer patient from Birmingham.

1) Emotionally true, viral trends can’t always be manufactured.

One reason Stephens Sutton story touched so many people, was because this came not from a charity, not from a CEO or digital media editor. This came from a young man with a goal to raise as much money as possible before he died. Authenticity like this cannot be manufactured by your charity, nor should it be. Stephens Goodbye message on Facebook was not a manufactured attempt to go viral, but it worked because it was honest, it had a genuine urgency (there was a chance he might not wake to see the original goal of £1million pound being raised) and because it captured people hearts. Of course a big help to all of this is that the infrastructure to donate was already in place. There was already a text donate number set up, he had an already very successful JustGiving page and had been raising money for over a year.

2) Charity’s need to be on the ball

We saw this a few months ago with the #nomakeupselfie - Cancer Research UK did not begin this viral trend, but it was online to ride of the back of it. It quickly responded, creating a hashtag, photo with amazing statistics worth sharing, and a relavent text donate number. Stephen’s Story has been yet another example of how important it is for your charity to be online every day. These viral trends tend to peak over a space of 24 hours, so your social media team can’t just be a Monday - Friday 9 - 5 job. They need space and freedom to post without sign offs, as these campaigns often rely on an urgent response. Teenage Cancer Trust quickly picked up on the sudden success and global reach of Stephens Story following his Facebook farewell post. Not only that, but JustGiving increased their servers to allow more people to donate, as announced on their Facebook page.

3) People want to donate and help.

Next time a charity, fundraiser, individual in the street or anybody else tells you they are struggling to raise money because ‘people don’t want to donate/sponsor/part with their cash’ - give them some encouragement and remind them of Stephen, a 19 year old boy who one day, from his deathbed, encouraged over £20k’s worth of donations per hour. Well done Stephen.

Animals Asia team up with Microsoft to produce new stunning interactive website

Animals Asia is an organization devoted to ending the barbaric practice of bear bile farming and aims to improve the welfare of animals in China and Vietnam. They promote compassion and respect for all animals and are working to bring about long-term change. 
As part of a team up with Microsoft, Animals Asia have just revealed a new interactive website - Exploring Moon Bears. The site, which is anticipated to be used by millions of school children across China, is unlike traditional websites, set up to look like 3 interactive books that look into the past and present of a Moon Bear named Jasper, who has been rescued, and then the final interactive book looks into 15 years of work from Animals Asia. The colourfull stories are beautifully presented, with a mix of 3D animation, 2D Graphical icons and clever interactive elements which all combine to teach the viewers about rescued and wild Moon Bears. The website works across all browsers, on PC and tablets and seems to be part of Microsofts ‘rethink the web’ campaign.
You can view the website here.
What do you think of this new work by Microsoft?

Animals Asia team up with Microsoft to produce new stunning interactive website

Animals Asia is an organization devoted to ending the barbaric practice of bear bile farming and aims to improve the welfare of animals in China and Vietnam. They promote compassion and respect for all animals and are working to bring about long-term change.

As part of a team up with Microsoft, Animals Asia have just revealed a new interactive website - Exploring Moon Bears. The site, which is anticipated to be used by millions of school children across China, is unlike traditional websites, set up to look like 3 interactive books that look into the past and present of a Moon Bear named Jasper, who has been rescued, and then the final interactive book looks into 15 years of work from Animals Asia. The colourfull stories are beautifully presented, with a mix of 3D animation, 2D Graphical icons and clever interactive elements which all combine to teach the viewers about rescued and wild Moon Bears.

The website works across all browsers, on PC and tablets and seems to be part of Microsofts ‘rethink the web’ campaign.

You can view the website here.

What do you think of this new work by Microsoft?

Graffiti artists Jim Vision, Teddy Baden and Barney Zadok were commissioned by Dogs Trust to create these stunning pieces to mark 35 years of the ‘A dog is for life, not just for Christmas’ slogan.

The slogan was created by Clarissa Baldwin, Chief Executive, in 1978. The longstanding campaign aims to raise awareness of the consequences of treating dogs as gifts or toys at Christmas and these new graffiti pieces hoped to furthur prevent ‘impulse’ buying of Dogs in Liverpool and London over the Christmas period.

Great Anti-Smoking Ad

"Almost all smokers know cigarettes are bad for them. They’re not delusional. Watch how one ad campaign got smokers to acknowledge the harms out loud, perhaps marking their first step to change." - Upworthy

This ad is a great example of how an act done by one person (in this case the children) can affect an individual, but also how a video of this act can then affect over a million people.

I think this video ad works so well because all adults, regardless of weather they smoke or not,  can see that the children are making a good point; why don’t we listen to ourselves? In this video the adults will tell the children that smoking is bad for them, as if they are more knowledgeable then they are, but in the end it is the children who are teaching them a lesson. Pointing out our human flaws can be a very effective way of getting your message across.

What do you think? Have any of you smokers been touched by this ad? What is it about this particular ad that works (or doesn’t) for you? We’d love to hear from you!

Reblogged from himynameis-rachel  4 notes

himynameis-rachel:

A little personal project I’ve been working on. I look at design blogs on a daily basis, and found that I began skimming through to find articles that really interested me, and these would be about design projects done for charity’s or to help raise awareness for an important cause. Sometimes the actual work wouldn’t impress me (such as this project) and it would make me think how they could have made it better and done more for the cause, other times (and most the time, like with these anti-racial campaigns) they are brilliant and show how great design can drive positive social change.

I’ve looked high and lo for websites or blogs where I can find this type of stuff in one place but failed to find anything that fits the bill (though more recently I found a ‘Charity Comms’ website that has a lot of the marketing and communication elements in one place, which is great!) So, I decided as what I want isn’t there, to do it myself!

Once it’s set up properly Koko will be a blog I keep of all these things. The name comes from Koko the Gorilla, a gorilla who can communicate with humans extremely well using sign language. Koko’s story stuck with me from the first time I saw her online and to me it really brings together whats really important about communication.

On top of all that, my ‘What would you do if you won the lottery?’ answer has always included setting up my own studio dedicated to this type of design and communication work, and it would be called Koko Comms! (Better start actually playing the lottery hey!?)

A little background to this blog and it’s logo!